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Cloud-burst.tv is a new website dedicated to promoting tolerance, acceptance and inclusion of people with autism through the inspiration of Literature, The Arts, Music and Media. CBTV supports The Art Of Inclusion, a novel project challenging the public to contemplate autism by completing an unfinished work of art appropriately entitled BareFace. Over the past four years more than 100 celebrities and public figures have met the challenge  adding their own creativity to produce co-artist work that has drawn crowds to dozens of museum and galleries in Germany and Australia.  Recently BareFace was used by The Madison House Foundation – an influential organization providing support for young autistic adults – to promote a fundraising event and a month-long exhibition of 200 works by 40 spectrum artists. For information about how this project can help attract attention to your organization’s outreach events by contacting Michael Leventhal at InfoCloudBursttv@gmail.com or use the form below

Links:
Fox New coverage of the Madison House exhibit
Cloud-Burst.tv
Madison House
Artist Gee Vero

contemplating autism

contemplating autism


Kids love to see themselves, Can we capitalize on this motivation to help autism?  Many respected researchers say yes.

Everybody loves to watch family movies.  Traveling soccer, picnics, and vacations.  We watch them all…. once.  Then we toss the tapes into the VHS cabinet, only to trot them back out in time for Aunt Mildred’s holiday visit.   (“Mildred.! You wore a mini skirt in college!  You were such a “hottie”.)  ”

“A picture is worth a thousand words.”  “Monkey see; monkey do”.   Our culture assumes the power of the image.  But have you personally ever considered how to harness that power in service of autism?  Besides the researchers who continue to explore this topic, there are companies who are doing that, while providing us with valuable tools.   But, what if you have students who do not even recognize themselves in a mirror.  Could video help these children as well?  Yes. Regardless of a child’s self-image, the teacher can capture their attention and then draw that focus to the video image.  In essence, the teacher leads the child to “see” himself.

View my Smile for the camera! clip.

Video can often have a profound effect on behavior, especially for moderate to severely involved students.  It doesn’t require a trained eye to recognize the “A-ha!” moment … the flash when a child first “gets it”.   When that happens, the child is ready to learn.  The importance of this moment is underscored by the work of  Drs Lynn and Robert Koegel, early ABA researchers,  who have developed Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT) “… a naturalistic intervention model derived from ABA approaches. Rather than target individual behaviors one at a time, PRT targets pivotal areas of a child’s development, such as motivation, responsivity to multiple cues, self-management, and social initiations. By targeting these critical areas, PRT results in widespread, collateral improvements in other social, communicative, and behavioral areas that are not specifically targeted.“

I do not make any claims for specific programming, commercial videos or styles of video modeling.  I applaud all efforts in this direction.  I simply make the case that video modeling, in any form, offers us a powerhouse tool  to engage a children in a manner that promotes communication,  social and academic skills acquisition as well as  decision-making.

Here is the first of 3 brief articles introducing the subject of video modeling to the general.   In subsequent posts, I will promote the importance of having wide spread participation in the survey.  I will also offer a line up of programming designed  to engage and inform the public about video modeling, in all its forms, now and in the future.


Video modeling is clinically safe, effective, simple, and cheap. It has been recommended for nearly forty years.  Yet, few parents or schools use it. With modern computers, making home movies is less intimidating than ever before.  With a little preparation, you could do it.  Assuming you believe that VSM significantly enhances the personal, social, and educational development of children on the Spectrum, what would stop you from using a wonderful, easy to use tool?

  • As a tech-savvy teacher, all you might need is some direction to get you started.
  • As a Principal, you would have educational, administrative and procedural issues to contend with.
  • Everybody is concerned about cost, purpose, validity, value, standards, training, ease of use, support, reporting or coordination?
  • Should your school initiate a program or should parents and therapists try it first?
  • How could a VM project help at your school?

To insure customer satisfaction, technology vendors address all these issues.  But, there is no sales support for video modeling because it is free. VM advocates must step up to pave the way for potential consumers of the tool.  Technology Integration in Special Education.ning(http://tech-in-sped.ning.com/) will:

  1. Survey parents, educators, therapists and administrators to identify their opinions and issues
  2. Locate and identify existant resources able to satisfy consumer needs
  3. Identify those needs not met by existent resources

A panel discussion and progress report will be presented at ISTE 2010.


2009/10/17

Research into the use of video as a tool with autism has continued for more than a generation. Despite repeated recommendation for the use of Video Self-Modeling with autism, only recently has technology made it practical for home and school use.  Current technology, both inexpensive and ubiquitous, enables anyone with average computer skills to quickly and easily produce their own modeling videos. But parents and teachers, who wish to use this tool, must first answer key questions: What can I use it for? What is involved? Who will show me how?

A group of researchers, teachers, parents and administrators are engaged in a dialogue to address these issues and will use ISTE 2010 as a platform to provide the public with the prerequisite information and direction to properly create and use this tool themselves.


Kids love to see themselves, Can we capitalize on this motivation to help autism?  Many respected researchers say yes.

Everybody loves to watch family movies.  Traveling soccer, picnics, and vacations.  We watch them all…. once.  Then we toss the tapes into the VHS cabinet, only to trot them back out in time for Aunt Mildred’s holiday visit.   (“Mildred.! You wore a mini skirt in college!  You were such a “hottie”.)  ”

“A picture is worth a thousand words.”  “Monkey see; monkey do”.   Our culture assumes the power of the image.  But have you personally ever considered how to harness that power in service of autism?  Besides the researchers who continue to explore this topic, there are companies who are doing that, while providing us with valuable tools.   But, what if you have students who do not even recognize themselves in a mirror.  Could video help these children as well?  Yes. Regardless of a child’s self-image, the teacher can capture their attention and then draw that focus to the video image.  In essence, the teacher leads the child to “see” himself.

View my Smile for the camera! clip.

Video can often have a profound effect on behavior, especially for moderate to severely involved students.  It doesn’t require a trained eye to recognize the “A-ha!” moment … the flash when a child first “gets it”.   When that happens, the child is ready to learn.  The importance of this moment is underscored by the work of  Drs Lynn and Robert Koegel, early ABA researchers,  who have developed Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT) “… a naturalistic intervention model derived from ABA approaches. Rather than target individual behaviors one at a time, PRT targets pivotal areas of a child’s development, such as motivation, responsivity to multiple cues, self-management, and social initiations. By targeting these critical areas, PRT results in widespread, collateral improvements in other social, communicative, and behavioral areas that are not specifically targeted.

I do not make any claims for specific programming, commercial videos or styles of video modeling.  I applaud all efforts in this direction.  I simply make the case that video modeling, in any form, offers us a powerhouse tool  to engage a children in a manner that promotes communication,  social and academic skills acquisition as well as  decision-making.

Here is the first of 3 brief articles introducing the subject of video modeling to the general.   In subsequent posts, I will promote the importance of having wide spread participation in the survey.  I will also offer a line up of programming designed  to engage and inform the public about video modeling, in all its forms, now and in the future.


Our first project promotes wider use of video modeling for autism in the home, the community and classroom.

Our first objective is to ensure that all educational stakeholders have, at their disposal, the resources they need to research, plan, initiate and maintain a productive VR program whether it be initiated by parents or is part of a home/school cooperative program.

Our first task is to survey parents, educators and administrators, basically posing the question, “What would make YOU feel comfortable enough to start using this great tool?”

Without consensus,  few children will ever benefit from use of this tool.
See you at  Technology Integration in Special Education